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L. Ernest Plouf Award

Annual award decided by Garden Judges to recognize the most consistently fragrant dormant daylily.  Discontinued in 2004.


2003 LAVENDER BLUE BABY Carpenter-J.
2002 SHIMMERING ELEGANCE Stamile
2001 ELEGANT CANDY Stamile
2000 CHANCE ENCOUNTER Stamile
1999 DENA MARIE Carpenter-J.
1998 WINEBERRY CANDY Stamile
1997 RASPBERRY CANDY Stamile
1996 FROSTED PINK ICE Stamile
1995 GINGHAM MAID Guidry
1994 LEMON LOLLYPOP Simpson-D.
1993 VANILLA FLUFF Joiner
1991 SILOAM SPIZZ Henry-P.
1990 SMOKY MOUNTAIN AUTUMN Guidry
1989 GOLDEN SCROLL Guidry
1988 CHORUS LINE Kirchhoff-D.
1987 EVENING BELL Peck
1986 HUDSON VALLEY Peck
1985 SILOAM DOUBLE CLASSIC Henry-P.
1984 SILOAM MAMA Henry-P.
1983 IDA MILES Hardy
1982 SILOAM DOUBLE ROSE Henry-P.
1981 FROZEN JADE Sellers
1980 TENDER LOVE Yancy-Harrison
1979 WILLARD GARDNER Lambert

L. Ernest Plouf
(1901-1979)

Leon Ernest Plouf was a life-long resident of Massachusetts, a breeder of daylilies, a disabled veteran of the W. W. II North African Campaign, and a professional portrait photographer.

Plouf began to grow daylilies in the 1920s. He attempted to obtain as many clones of the English breeders Yeld and Perry as possible. Curators of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew and Edinburgh provided four species. Plouf was much influenced by American breeders such as Betscher, Kraus, Leonian, and Stout. Stout visited Plouf’s Craemore Daylily Gardens in Lawrence (MA), north of Boston, and included Plouf in a published list of distributors of species and clones. An important form of Hemerocallis fulva var. rosea that Plouf acquired and named ‘Pastelrose’ (Plouf 1942), was introduced by him in 1939.

Plouf bred for reddish, hardy, sun-resistant cultivars; two successes were ‘Craemore Red’ and ‘Craemore Ruby’. The AHS database shows 81 diploid daylilies attributed to Plouf. Many reference North Africa in their names. One was named for Quaker poet and abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier, who, Plouf said, was “born a few minutes’ walk” from his garden. For many years Plouf updated his inventory of the “100 Best Dormant Clones” that represented many breeders.

In 1979, Plouf established a $10,000 trust, funding a $500 cash “L. Ernest Plouf Consistently Very Fragrant Hemerocallis Award,” hoping to stimulate the development of fragrance in daylilies. The L. Ernest Plouf Award appeared on the annual Awards and Honors Ballot from 1979 through 2003, and could be won once by a cultivar. “Any smell” was eligible for consideration. Because Plouf died in early 1979, he may never have seen the award realized.

The original Trust Agreement specified that the award would “be available as long as the Society functions.” In 2004, the award was discontinued, partly because the dormancy requirement had become too limiting.

Sources for the above were articles in the 1939 and 1941 issues of Herbertia, and writings in issues of the The Hemerocallis Journal, The Daylily Journal, and AHS Yearbooks.

– Courtesy of the AHS Archives and Sharon Cusick

© Copyright 1995-2008, 2015 by the American Hemerocallis Society, Inc.
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